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Ice Cream Calculator

Below, you'll find the ice cream calculator I use to balance my mixes. It's very much a work in progress. And may well contain mistakes!

​If you do spot any mistakes or have any suggestions of things you'd like to see added, please let me know.

How it works​

​Hopefully this is pretty obvious. Add your data and measurements to the green cells. This should update the pink cells.

​Once you've added your information, compare the numbers in the "Total %" row to the guidelines I've added below the calculator. If your numbers are way off, then your mix is probably unbalanced and you're likely to have problems!

​"Relative Sweetness" is a measure of how sweet the mixture is. It's relative to the sweetness of Sucrose. So if you only have Sucrose in your mix, Relative Sweetness will be equal to the percentage of Sugar in the mixture.

"Overrun" is the amount of air that the ice cream maker has added to ​your mixture, as a percentage.

If you're adding fruit to your mixture, check out the Sugar and Other Solids percentages for loads of different fruit at the bottom of the page. You'll need to add these values at the top of the calculator before you add your fruit weights.​

The calculator​

Mix Composition Guidelines

The approximate compositions of commercial ice creams (taken from the book Ice Cream by Goff & Hartel)...

Ice cream

Fat %

MSNF %

Sugars %

Stabilizers %

Total solids %

Nonfat ice cream

< 0.5

12-14

18-22

1.0

28-32

Low-fat ice cream

2-5

12-14

18-21

0.8

28-32

Light ice cream

5-7

11-12

18-20

0.5

30-35

Gelato

4-8

11-12

16-22

0.5

36-43

Reduced fat ice cream

7-9

10-12

18-19

0.4

32-36

Standard ice cream

10-12

9-10

14-17

0.2-0.4

36-38

Premium ice cream

12-14

8-10

13-16

0.2-0.4

38-40

Superpremium ice cream

14-18

5-8

14-17

0-0.2

40-42

Frozen yogurt: regular

3-6

9-13

15-17

0.5

30-36

Frozen yogurt: nonfat

< 0.5

9-14

15-17

0.6

28-32

Sherbet

1-2

1-3

22-28

0.4-0.5

28-34

Useful data

Egg Weights​

Egg

Small

Medium

Large

X-Large

Jumbo

Yolk

13 g

15 g

17 g

19 g

21 g

White

25 g

29 g

33 g

37 g

42 g

Composition of Fruit and Vegetables

Fruit

Water %

Sugar %

Other Solids %

Total Solids %

Fat %

Apple

85

11

4

15

Apricot

85

10

5

15

Avacado

68

1

31

32

24

Banana

74

19

7

26

Blackberry

85

9

6

15

Blackcurrant

81

10

9

19

Blueberry

77

20

3

23

Cherry (Morello)

85

11

4

15

Cherry (Sweet)

83

13

4

15

Clementine

87

10

3

13

Coconut

45

5

50

55

36.5

Cranberry

87

8

5

13

Currant

16

66

18

84

Date (dried)

20

65

15

80

Elderberry

81

7

12

19

Fig

80

13

7

20

Fig (dried)

25

54

21

75

Gooseberry

87

10

3

13

Grape

81

16

3

19

Grapefruit

89

9

2

11

Greengage

81

14

5

19

Guava

81

7

12

19

Jackfruit

73

15

12

27

Kiwi

84

10

6

16

Lemon

90

3

7

10

Lime

91

2

7

9

Lychee

82

17

1

18

Mandarin

87

10

3

13

Mango

82

13

5

18

Medlar

87

4

9

13

Musk Melon

87

12

1

13

Nectarine

88

9

3

12

Orange

86

10

4

14

Papaya

88

2

10

12

Passion Fruit

77

13

10

23

Peach

88

9

3

12

Pear

84

10

6

16

Pepper

91

3

6

9

Persimmon

81

16

3

19

Pineapple

85

13

2

15

Plum

84

12

4

16

Prune

24

55

31

86

Pumpkin

91

3

6

9

Quince

83

8

9

17

Rasberry

84

6

10

16

Redcurrant

85

8

7

15

Rhubarb

94

2

4

6

Star Fruit

91

4

5

9

Strawberry

90

6

4

10

Tomato

94

3

3

6

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 6 comments
Johnny - January 11, 2018

Fantastic website!
In the The Calculator, you have af row that says PAC. what is PAC?

Reply
Suppadej - January 29, 2018

There are absolutely beneficial to read, yet I’m still wondering, what are counted as “Total Solid.” They are sugar, fat and MSNF, aren’t they?

Reply
Pilar - February 1, 2018

I am just beginning with ice-cream for my own use and I feel passionate about doing it well from the beginning. I live in Spain so I prefer recipe books with measurements in grams, after hours of looking I bought 2 books, the English one is titled “Hello My name is Ice Cream, the art and Science of the Scoop” by Dana Cree and “Helados Caseros, la guía definitiva hacia el helado perfecto” by María José Mancebo.
In my obsessive understanding about ice cream recipes without eggs, yesterday I came across your site. Thank you so much is very valuable and your charts…I bless you for it.
I have an orchard with about 60 varieties of fruit trees, specially citrus type. Where can I find the need information about the fruits which are not on your list? I have tried without success. I see there is some significant differences amongst lemon, lime, orange and will love to know the contents of bergamot citrus fruit, o please recommend me which one in your chart to use as a substitute.
I will also love to obtein the values of
Green or black Zapote (Pouteria sapota, I believe)
Feijoa fruit
Fresh ginger

About your charts, where do I put the amount of Lecithin in the calculator?
To make any citrus ice cream I figure I have to put the juice not the pureed pulp, so this will not affect the solids

Many thanks for all plus for your attention

Reply
    Carl - February 8, 2018

    Hi Pilar,

    Sorry about the delay getting back to you!

    I’ve also got the Dana Cree book and I think it’s really good with some interesting stuff on the science which I hadn’t thought about.

    I’m not sure where you’d get the information on fruits that aren’t on my list. I copied the list from Ices: The Definitive Guide.

    This site could be useful:
    https://www.eatthismuch.com/

    It suggests Bergamot Oranges are:
    87% Water
    9% Sugar
    4% Other Solids
    https://www.eatthismuch.com/food/view/bergamot-oranges,139827/

    As for the Lecithin, I would combine it with any other Stabilizers and put it in the Stabilizers cell.

    I hope that helps!

    Carl

    Reply

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